the lit i love
deep-dark-fears:


Thanks for sending me ghost stories, everyone! It’s been fun and horrifying to check my inbox lately. I’m slowly drawing my way through your submissions.
Here’s one from an anonymous reader:
Read More

deep-dark-fears:

Thanks for sending me ghost stories, everyone! It’s been fun and horrifying to check my inbox lately. I’m slowly drawing my way through your submissions.

Here’s one from an anonymous reader:

Read More

Nostalgia is inevitably a yearning for a past that never existed, and when I’m writing, there are no bees to sting me out of my sentimentality. For me at least, fiction is the only way I can even begin to twist my lying memories into something true.
John Green
writingquotes (via nomoredramas)
treadmill-to-oblivion:

“Children’s reading and children’s thinking are the rock-bottom base upon which this country will rise. Or not rise. In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that books for children have a greater potential for good or evil than any other form of literature on Earth.”
-Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 - September 24, 1991)

treadmill-to-oblivion:

“Children’s reading and children’s thinking are the rock-bottom base upon which this country will rise. Or not rise. In these days of tension and confusion, writers are beginning to realize that books for children have a greater potential for good or evil than any other form of literature on Earth.”

-Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 - September 24, 1991)

powells:

Happy Earth Day! Make your profile picture one of our magical Earth Day 2014 patches and spread the love of used books far and wide! http://powells.us/1raK4Yr

My year as a school library volunteer

thepinakes:

I’ve spent the academic year volunteering in a public elementary school library. My weekly shifts coincided with a regular 4th grade class visit. My last shift of this academic year wrapped up this morning.

A few things I learned:

  • Calvin & Hobbes is still incredibly popular, even though Bill Watterson retired almost a decade before these kids were born.
  • 4th graders love graphic novels, especially Bone.
  • The vast majority of our circulation came from books in bins organized by series, and very little from off of the shelves. Easier to find, easier to grab, easier to beat the other kids to what you want.
  • It’s awkward being addressed as Mr. when you’re not used to it.
  • 4th grade boys will hit each other over a book.
  • Kids do a lot more reading than stereotypes suggest.
  • The school librarian teaches an amazing variety of things. I saw her teach using computers for research, understanding literary genres, fun poetry techniques, understanding protagonist point of view, and using reference works for research. Oh, and computer coding.
  • The school librarian is also a fabulous reader of stories and great at reader’s advisory for a six-year range of children and reading levels.
  • She’s also the point person for getting the students up to speed on the interface of the new, computer-based standardized tests that will be implemented next year as part of Common Core (and directly affect school funding). I wonder what schools without school librarians will do.
  • I am very grateful San Francisco voters passed a bond measure funding school librarians in every public school.
  • These kids will be more ready for college because of what they’re learning right now as nine year olds from their school librarian.

I had fun working with the kids. And I learned a lot from the school librarian.

Post mirrored on Wordpress.

A Series of Unfortunate Events + Wicked - Brett Helquist Illustrations Part 3 

Part 1 

Part 2 

A writer is a world trapped in a person.
Victor Hugo (via post-traumatic-apathy)
born-with-it-maybe:

weekend look beautifully cut,

born-with-it-maybe:

weekend look beautifully cut,

The more you read, the less apt you are to make a fool of yourself with your pen or word processor.
Stephen King (via writingquotes)

sherlilocked:

Books are the perfect entertainment: no commercials, no batteries, hours of enjoyment for each dollar spent. What I wonder is why everybody doesn’t carry a book around for those inevitable dead spots in life.

-Stephen King

I know exactly what I would do with immortality: I would read every book in the library.
Mark Jason Dominus (via bibliophilebunny)
marioncolibraries:

Can’t get enough of these horror shows? Put down the remote and pick up one of these books.
If you like American Horror Story: Coven, then read:
Deliverance from Evil by Frances Hill - This book takes you back to the place where it all began, Salem.
Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau by Martha Ward - Delve into the world of the real Marie Laveau.
The Witches of Eastwick by John Updike - The story of three witches and their relationship with a mysterious man. It’s more satire than horror, but should still satisfy AHS: Coven fans. 
If you like Bates Motel then read (besides Psycho, of course): 
Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin - Like Psycho, this classic horror novel was successfully adapted for film. It has also been slated for an upcoming TV miniseries. 
The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris - Ed Gein, a real-life serial killer, served as inspiration for Norman Bates and The Silence of the Lambs' pursued murderer, Buffalo Bill.
Zombie by Joyce Carol Oates - If you watch Bates Motel because you’re interested in what creates a serial killer, then this book is for you. Joyce Carol Oates deftly explores the topic with her psychotic protagonist. 
If you like The Walking Dead, then read (in addition to the graphic novels, obvs):
Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick - The story of a 17-year-old girl’s fight to survive after a disaster kills most people and causes others to either become zombies or gain strange powers.
The Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis - Real zombies?!
Zone One by Colson Whitehead - Another take on the zombie apocalypse trope. This book follows a member of a civilian team sent to resettle Manhattan after a zombie plague.
Any titles you would add to these lists?

marioncolibraries:

Can’t get enough of these horror shows? Put down the remote and pick up one of these books.

If you like American Horror Story: Coven, then read:

Deliverance from Evil by Frances Hill - This book takes you back to the place where it all began, Salem.

Voodoo Queen: The Spirited Lives of Marie Laveau by Martha Ward - Delve into the world of the real Marie Laveau.

The Witches of Eastwick by John Updike - The story of three witches and their relationship with a mysterious man. It’s more satire than horror, but should still satisfy AHS: Coven fans. 

If you like Bates Motel then read (besides Psycho, of course): 

Rosemary’s Baby by Ira Levin - Like Psycho, this classic horror novel was successfully adapted for film. It has also been slated for an upcoming TV miniseries

The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris - Ed Gein, a real-life serial killer, served as inspiration for Norman Bates and The Silence of the Lambs' pursued murderer, Buffalo Bill.

Zombie by Joyce Carol Oates - If you watch Bates Motel because you’re interested in what creates a serial killer, then this book is for you. Joyce Carol Oates deftly explores the topic with her psychotic protagonist. 

If you like The Walking Deadthen read (in addition to the graphic novels, obvs):

Ashes by Ilsa J. Bick - The story of a 17-year-old girl’s fight to survive after a disaster kills most people and causes others to either become zombies or gain strange powers.

The Serpent and the Rainbow by Wade Davis - Real zombies?!

Zone One by Colson Whitehead - Another take on the zombie apocalypse trope. This book follows a member of a civilian team sent to resettle Manhattan after a zombie plague.

Any titles you would add to these lists?

Reading is everything. Reading makes me feel like I’ve accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. Reading makes me smarter. Reading gives me something to talk about later on. Reading is the unbelievably healthy way my attention deficit disorder medicates itself. Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it’s a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it’s a way of making contact with someone else’s imagination after a day that’s all too real. Reading is grist. Reading is bliss.